artandsciencejournal:

Encased

A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.

If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.

Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.

Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.

Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.

-Anna Paluch

An Infinite List of Favorite Collections - Krikor Jabotian S/S 2013 Haute Couture

(via icantthinkofanythingwitty)

" Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do. "
" All novelists should live in two different worlds: a real one and an unreal one. "

theonlymagicleftisart:

Latest Photography by Oleg Oprisco

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thedsgnblog:

Quote(s) of the week - 21/07/2014

55 Hi’s    |    http://55his.com

55 Hi’s was started in 2010 by Ross Moody as a simple means of spreading inspiring quotes and quirky ideas. It has since spiraled out of control—in the best way possible—into an online greetings collective, of sorts. A destination for graphic goodness, tasteful typography, and artful alliteration. 

At 55 Hi’s, sincere life lessons are laid delicately onto handmade french paper where they frolic joyfully, side-by-side, with cards that become shot glasses. Why? Because both of those things will make you smile, and smiling is a nice thing.

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theonlymagicleftisart:

Flickr Group Pool Highlights - Week of July 21st 2014

Contributing Photographers from top to bottom:

1. Michel Nguie2. Gregor Petrikovic 3. Jeffrey Mckee 4. Ana Mercedes 5. Manon Paradis 6Leonor Valente 7. Thais L. 8. Veronika Gilkova 9. Miles Bowers 10. Sean Gilchrist

Hop in on the fun and join our group pool! All artists welcome, not just photographers.

Our Quarterly boxes are now $50 $30. The next box will include a hardcover photobook of Brandon C. Long's Polaroid photography and one lucky subscriber will receive a Polaroid camera and a pack of Impossible filmquarterly.co/art 

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